Recent Posts

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 10
11
PROJECTS, ALL EXCEPT VEHICLES / Re: Plumbing
« Last post by bmwrd0 on Today at 05:30:40 PM »
Oh, I like the work, I am a little slower now, but that is to be expected. The house was remodeled in 1960 apparently, and while that was owner done, much of it is pretty solid, albeit funky. In about 1980 various things were done, like the bathrooms "updated" and kitchen counters. Things like that. That stuff is horribly done, with cheap hardware. And after that, the guy we bought it from did no real maintenance or upkeep. I talk to the neighbor, an electrical engineer, and find out that if anything went wrong, HE was the one who fixed it.

So, now when something happens, I put in quality hardware, install it right, and so on. It is nice that the house wasn't gutted at some point and totally redone in the cheap Home Depot contractor way, which happened to so many of these homes.

One of the nice things, people will come up out of the blue to say that they lived there 40-50-60 years ago, and love how we are treating it. One day, an older man came by with his granddaughter (he was about 60) and told me that his grandfather was the one who initially built it. Who's name is attached to the house. That was kinda cool.
'
12
PROJECTS, ALL EXCEPT VEHICLES / Re: Plumbing
« Last post by gtermini on Today at 05:17:56 PM »
http://saffronsupplyco.com/Home_Page.html

If I have to make a big plumbing purchase, this is my go to place.

Fuk Lowes. We have on in Mac, absolutely never has what I need. HD is a little better, but not worth the drive to Salem from home, and if I go that far, I'll go to a real supply house.
13
PROJECTS, ALL EXCEPT VEHICLES / Re: Plumbing
« Last post by DeadNutz on Today at 05:16:37 PM »
I feel your pain Aaron. We had a fixture and faucet store in town that only stocked the good Kohler, Moen and other stuff. When we re-did the shower after we bought the house we bought the good Moen shower valves and Kohler heads. They weren't cheap but they will outlast us unlike the cheap plastic crap at the big box stores. That store is gone now and if I need anymore quality genuine Kohler faucet stems I will have to hunt for them.
14
GENERAL DISCUSSION TO INCLUDE OFF TOPIC / Re: How cold is it?
« Last post by goodfellow on Today at 05:10:37 PM »
Cold front came through about noon and just rain here but snow in the mountains. Snow level got down to 7,000' but we are at 5,000' so we're good. I can see the snow on the ski runs across the valley up by Lake Tahoe. It was in the 80's the last 3 days but 50's today and we may get below freezing tonight. Fall doesn't start for a few days yet. :o

Damn -- I could not survive like that anymore. In my older age I crave a warm climate. Good luck DN !
15
PROJECTS, ALL EXCEPT VEHICLES / Re: Plumbing
« Last post by goodfellow on Today at 05:08:11 PM »
I can sympathize. I once (in my younger/dumber years) decided to completely finish the inside of a timber frame home shell. Lowes and HD were useless, but thankfully an old-fashioned hardware and lumber yard was only slightly further away and the oldtimers were a wealth of information. It took two years longer than planned to finish, but it was a valuable life lesson.

Good luck in your "old house" adventures. In 20-30 years you'll look back on this time and marvel at your patience and perseverance -- LOL
16
GENERAL DISCUSSION TO INCLUDE OFF TOPIC / Re: How cold is it?
« Last post by DeadNutz on Today at 05:06:38 PM »
Cold front came through about noon and just rain here but snow in the mountains. Snow level got down to 7,000' but we are at 5,000' so we're good. I can see the snow on the ski runs across the valley up by Lake Tahoe. It was in the 80's the last 3 days but 50's today and we may get below freezing tonight. Fall doesn't start for a few days yet. :o
17
GENERAL TOOL AND MACHINE DISCUSSION / Re: ever buy a tool just because?
« Last post by bmwrd0 on Today at 04:55:35 PM »
Story of my life.

Nice save on the Plomb.
18
PROJECTS, ALL EXCEPT VEHICLES / Plumbing
« Last post by bmwrd0 on Today at 04:42:16 PM »
I hate plumbing.

I hate that every single thing in my house takes five times as much work as it should, as it is a 100-year-old house, and it had been pretty neglected for years.

I hate brass compression fittings that corrode over 30 plus years. I hate it when the only way to get leverage on said fitting is to "come from behind." In other words, put a hole in the wall.

I hate it that nothing in a 100-year-old house is off the shelf at a box store. If it is, it was probably cheap Chicom crap installed in the '80s and is now breaking down.

I hate that the nearest big box store is Lowes, which never has any quality parts, plumbing or electrical, but that is the nearest store. I think it is funny that I can go to HD and buy US-made plumbing fixtures and Klein tools, but I have to go all the way to the other side of town. I know more than anyone who works there, but I can at least find some quality stuff. The ACE around here is very new, inside a grocery store and the employees are all green as fake money. There are real hardware stores around, one in each direction but 10 miles away.

So, the toilet is no longer running all the time, a new shutoff valve installed, and a project for tomorrow, repairing the hole. Maybe I will put in an electrical fixture.
19
Why am I writing this? becuase I just came back from having a FE alignment done on my car and a tire rotation. Getting ready for a long trip and wanted to ensure proper tire wear. Well, it turns out that the "technicians" either forgot, or were incapable of resetting the monitor to accomodate the new tire positions. Glad I checked -- no big deal, but had it been an emergency I would have been "up the creek". I reset the monitor myself usiing a cheap import GM clone TPMS tool.

That effort got me to thinking that there may be a bit of confusion on how to reset the TPMS on GM cars. In fact there are quite a few methods out there using special tools and/or just using your key fob. Depending on the model and year you have, resetting the TPMS monitor can often become frustrating.

In most all cases it's a good idea to drive the car around the block to wake up the tire pressure sensors. They are not always on -- many systems will eventually go into a "sleep" mode after a certain time of inactivity. If that happens, they may not recognize a relearn command. 

1) Basic Key Fob technique -- probably won't work on more modern GM vehicles.
The most basic way for most GM cars from 2000 until 2015-16 is to use the key fob method. Press the key fob "lock" and "unlock" buttons simultaneously for ten seconds and wait for the car to beep. The usual procedure is to start from the driver's side front (usually a headlight or marker light is lit up to indicate which side needs your attention) and deflate the tire to about 10psi or until the horn beeps and then refill air until the desired pressure is reached. Then look around for the next corner where the marker or headlight is glowing, and deflate that tire until the horn beeps -- refill and move on. Continue until all four corners are done and the car horn beeps twice after the last tire is completed.

2) Trip odometer setup -- (only on older cars without key fobs)
Push the trip odometer until it displays "Tire Position Re-Learn" -- or something to that effect. The car horn will beep and you use the same procedure as with the afore mentioned key fob technique.

3) Use a Tire Monitor Reset Tool -- specific to GM
These GM specific tools are less than $20 on Amazon and they will reset most all late model GM systems (there are exceptions with very old TPMS monitor systems in the 1990s)



3a) Use the car's Digital Information Center (DIC) to scroll through the menu until it reads "TPMS" or "Tire" monitor re-learn. Initiate the relearn by pressing the "check" mark button on the DIC controller. Then look at the cars headlights or marker lights and see which one is lit up (usually you start with the driver's side front). Point the GM TPMS tool antenna close to the valve stem and wait for the horn to beep. Then move on to the next corner that has a light on. Same procedure - hold the GM tool close to the valve stem and wait for the beep. After all four corners are done, the horn will beep twice to acknowledge that the system has been reset.

3b) Use the key fob method to start the procedure. Press the "lock" and "unlock" buttons for a 10 seconds and wait for the horn to beep, then use the GM TPMS tool and move from corner to corner in the same manner as described in the previous DIC (3a) scenario. The car's lights will guide you to the proper corner to ensure a correct reset sequence. When successfully completed, the horn will beep twice. 

3c) Put the key in the ignition and turn to accessory position. Then push the "lock" and "unlock" button on the key fob simultaneously for 10 seconds until the car beeps. Then move from corner to corner in the same manner as described in the DIC (3a) scenario. The car's lights will guide you to the proper corner to ensure a correct sequence. When successfully completed, the horn will beep twice. 


Problems!! If one of the sensors fails to activate with either the GM tool or by deflating the tire to 10psi, the sensor may not be awake or the battery may be shot. You may also have a faulty sensor -- remember there are usually cheap Chinese electronics in GM cars. Best scenario, drive the car for a few miles and then repeat the process. A second option is to slightly wiggle the valve stem to jar the tiny IC that is in the TPMS sensor body. Other than that -- you may have to replace it.

Good luck!!





20
GENERAL DISCUSSION TO INCLUDE OFF TOPIC / Re: rip ric ocasek
« Last post by hickory n Steel on Today at 12:21:16 PM »
Sad news, their songs really grow on you.
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 10